Leadership in Shakespeare’s work

How does a leader decide whether to be lenient or to set an example? Nancy Koehn presents this question by drawing from a harrowing scene in Shakespeare’s Henry V.

Nancy Koehn: Shakespeare’s leadership power is about all the teaching that his characters do by conscious, explicit example or by the way not to do it.  Think about the scene in Henry V where the King is on his way to Agincourt, and everyone’s sick and they’re way outnumbered and one of his old drinking buddies when he was Prince Hal, Bardoff, is caught stealing from a church.  And so Henry has to make this very interesting decision about what he’s going to do with his friend.  Is he going to let him off, as Pistol, one of his other drinking buddies is begging him to, or is he going to set an example as a leader of what people who violate the code of behavior do?  And he hangs him.  He decides to hang him.  But there the teaching is in the actual action, right?  And by virtue of you can’t mess with the mission, folks, or you’ll have to be sacrificed.  So the costs of violation are high.  And so you think about what that must have cost Henry V and how great his leap has been from the young prince, the hooligan, to the Warrior King, and there Shakespeare teaching by action and example, including negative examples.

Nuestros sistemas Educativos son Anacrónicos

La educación tiene 3 grandes objetivos:

1- económico

2- cultural

3- personal

Hemos pasado de una sociedad industrial a una sociedad de servicios. Necesitamos un sistema educativo que se actualice, que cambie y se adapte y flexibilice a las nuevas necesidades y desafíos.

Sistemas educativos en donde la creatividad no sea ignorada.  En donde la visión de inteligencia no sea tan reduccionista.

What is nanotechnology?

What is Nanotechnology?

A basic definition: Nanotechnology is the engineering of functional systems at the molecular scale. This covers both current work and concepts that are more advanced.

In its original sense, ‘nanotechnology’ refers to the projected ability to construct items from the bottom up, using techniques and tools being developed today to make complete, high performance products.

Nanotechnology (sometimes shortened to “nanotech”) is the manipulation of matter on an atomic and molecular scale. The earliest, widespread description of nanotechnology referred to the particular technological goal of precisely manipulating atoms and molecules for fabrication of macroscale products, also now referred to as molecular nanotechnology.

A more generalized description of nanotechnology was subsequently established by the National Nanotechnology Initiative, which defines nanotechnology as the manipulation of matter with at least one dimension sized from 1 to 100 nanometers. This definition reflects the fact that quantum mechanical effects are important at this quantum-realm scale, and so the definition shifted from a particular technological goal to a research category inclusive of all types of research and technologies that deal with the special properties of matter that occur below the given size threshold.

It is therefore common to see the plural form “nanotechnologies” as well as “nanoscale technologies” to refer to the broad range of research and applications whose common trait is size. Because of the variety of potential applications (including industrial and military), governments have invested billions of dollars in nanotechnology research.

Through its National Nanotechnology Initiative, the USA has invested 3.7 billion dollars. The European Union has invested 1.2 billion and Japan 750 million dollars

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